Professional Logo Designers: Are They Worth It?

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Professional Logo Designers: Are They Worth It?

On February 4, 2017, Posted by , in Design, tags , With Comments Off on Professional Logo Designers: Are They Worth It?

Whether it is Bond’s iconic 007 graphic or the curly ‘M’ of McDonald’s fame, the shining horse of Ferrari or the epic front of the Star Wars movies, a logo can truly define an idea. It is nearly impossible to think of the Harry Potter series without envisioning the striking scar of its protagonist or to picture the Adidas brand without those sleek, bold stripes.

There are few things more powerful than an image. It is the first thing people will imagine when they hear the name, and it is the quickest way for a product to become embedded in the public psyche. There’s a truly remarkable power in a logo, and for this reason, a good logo demands a good price.

Or at least, it used to. But with the advent of an ever-expanding digital marketplace and a new era for creative designers, there are now plenty of ways to hire logo creators at prices not only affordable but dirt-cheap. So, the question becomes: why pay a professional logo designer when you can hire a passionate amateur for a hundred bucks less?

There are hundreds of schemes out there offering downright unbelievable value, some advertising quality services from as little as $5 bucks. Many of these sites are smooth, easy and attractive, offering a multitude of writers, illustrators, voice actors, and, yes, logo designers, all available at the click of a button. 

Downright unbelievable indeed. There is got to be a catch, right?

Professional Logo Designers Cedric Mills

Well… yes, actually. Namely that these quality services often are not quality at all, but cheap scams offering lazily edited stock images in place of original art, copy-and-pasted chunks of text in place of fresh paragraphs, and even work stolen from more established freelancers in place of anything of actual value.

This brush should not be used to paint every user on these sites – for some entry-level creatives, it is an appealing way to get into being paid for their work. This said, when something seems too good to be true, it probably is. There’s a reason $5 seems an absurdly unbelievable price – in the real world, it pays for a maximum of fifteen minutes worth of service, and very few great logos have been designed in fifteen minutes. The fact is, if you want a real logo, you need a real designer. A professional designer.

So let us look at things a different way: if the quality of work when using sites like these is so poor, is it worth spending large amounts of cash for something better?

The answer to this is a little more complicated. After all, how much are you really willing to pay for a small collection of pixels and colors? Is it really worth hiring a professional designer for something as simple as a logo?

Professional Logo Designers Cedric Mills

It all depends on your own marketing strategy. A good logo can cement your brand in the minds of your customers, it can turn an item into a legend, it can elevate a mere utility into a household name.

There’s a simple solution. It is important to remember that not all professional designers charge for their work like they are Leonardo Da Vinci, and it is important to appreciate that they respect the need for the economy as much as you respect the need for a quality logo. There’s a crucial balance to be struck; a relationship that works out affordable for you and gives them fair payment simultaneously. There are thousands of professional designers out there, and many will be happy to negotiate a deal that benefits both parties. So if you’re worried about the price of a good logo, fear not: designers are here to help.

Of course, this opens the door to a whole new avenue of options, and it can be difficult to know where to start. Search ‘logo designers’ on google and it seems the whole of the industry comes toppling down in the results. It’s a brilliant, thriving market, great for building bridges and finding what you are looking for, but it’s also an intimidating number of options. The thousands of professional designers working online form an overwhelming figure – so where do you begin?

Professional Logo Designers Cedric Mills

A good way to start is, quite simply, by browsing. The designer for you is out there if you’re just willing to look for it. The internet is the best place to begin, offering all the information you could ever want about professional designers, their rates, and their details. It’s easy to narrow down your options – portfolios are the first thing you should look at when exploring designers’ websites. If they have what you’re after, this is how you’ll know it. If their style just is not what you are looking for, move on. When you find the perfect designer, get in touch – if you can afford them, you’re in luck. If you can’t, try your hand at negotiating – you can’t put a price on the perfect logo, and most professional designers recognize what’s reasonable and what isn’t.

Naturally, every professional designer has their own way of working. Some operate in groups, some individually. Some will take your specifications, crank out three or four designs and send them your way for feedback. Others will be with you every step of the way, making sure you’re getting the product you’re after on their first draft. With such an array of methods, it’s vital to find the one that works for you. Ask around, talk to your contacts, work with recommendations and keep up a positive, creative, open forum with the designers you hire. It could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Whatever your business, be it a music label, a publisher or even washing machine repair, the logo is the most established, reliable, vibrant marketing tool that exists. Its value cannot be emphasized enough. Don’t choose cheap substitutes over quality pieces. Don’t resort to imitations and knock-offs. Avoid settling for anything less than the logo that will make your brand a legend in its own right.

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